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Pet Food & Nutrition

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Canine Health Conditions

Pet health problems are stressful for owner and pet alike. Understanding potential canine health problems or conditions is the first step toward resolving these issues.

Canine Health Conditions

Pet health problems are stressful for owner and pet alike. Understanding potential canine health problems or conditions is the first step toward resolving these issues.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

What are the symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in dogs?

The following article is taken from the "Purina® Animal Instincts" Podcast Series. Learn more at www.purina.com.

It’s not unusual for dogs to have occasional bouts of constipation or diarrhea that get better on their own. But if your dog has ongoing episodes, or if you see blood or mucous in your pet’s stool, consult a veterinarian. Michael Lieb, a Professor of Small Animal Internal Medicine at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, says your pet might be suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Lieb states, “it can be quite serious, sometimes requiring hospitalization and fluid therapy.”

Stress and bad eating habits are often associated with this syndrome, but not exclusively. Your veterinarian will run a series of tests to determine exactly what’s wrong and come up with a treatment solution.

Download a .pdf to learn more about stress diarrhea.

– Dr. Andrea Looney, DVM 

Learn more about dog food for sensitive stomachs here.

Dog Constipation

My dog appears to be constipated. What should I do?

The following article is taken from the "Purina® Animal Instincts" Podcast Series. Learn more at www.purina.com.

If your dog is straining to defecate or has hard stools, he’s probably constipated. Give your veterinarian a call. There are many reasons why dogs can become blocked up – dehydration, a lack of fiber, or an enlarged prostate may play a role. But constipation can also indicate a more serious condition such as a blocked intestinal tract, hypothyroidism, tumors, or a neurological disorder.

Download a .pdf to learn more about dietary indescretion. 

So if you think your canine is constipated, try taking him for an extra walk and make sure he is drinking plenty of water. If that doesn’t relieve the problem, take him to the veterinarian for a thorough exam. Treatment will depend on the cause, but may include medication, a stool softener, or a high fiber diet.

– Dr. Larry McDaniel, DVM

Learn more about dog food for sensitive stomachs here.