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Pet Food & Nutrition

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Feline Health Conditions

Pet health problems are stressful for owner and pet alike. Understanding certain health conditions your cat might be facing can help bring you one step closer toward nutritionally managing the problem.

Feline Health Conditions

Pet health problems are stressful for owner and pet alike. Understanding certain health conditions your cat might be facing can help bring you one step closer toward nutritionally managing the problem.

Heart Disease In Cats

What are common symptoms of heart disease in pets?

The following article is taken from the "Purina® Animal Instincts" Podcast Series. Learn more at www.purina.com.

Sudden onset shortness of breath, apparent weakness, or a distended abdomen might be signs of heart disease in either your cat or your dog. But all too often, there are no symptoms, so your pet’s best bet is regular visits to the veterinarian.

Jonathan Abbott, a Cardiologist at the Virginia Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, says there are a number of ways to diagnose heart disease in pets: “x-rays of the chest, electrocardiography and cardiac ultrasound or echocardiography are the tests most commonly used.”

Your veterinarian will also be able to listen for a heart murmur and use a blood test to check for heartworm. Once diagnosed, there are treatment options that will enhance both the quality and length of your pet’s life.

– Dr. Andrea Looney, DVM

Cat Hypertension

Do dogs and cats suffer from Hypertension?

The following article is taken from the "Purina® Animal Instincts" Podcast Series. Learn more at www.purina.com.

You thought you were the only one in the family with high blood pressure? Cats and dogs can suffer from hypertension, too, even though they often show no obvious clinical signs.

Recognizing and treating hypertension is a relatively recent development in veterinary medicine. Treatments for the hypertensive pet may include a low-salt diet and blood pressure-reducing medication. In pets, hypertension is almost always secondary to some other disorder such as kidney disease, thyroid disease, or diabetes. So the chance of successfully treating the hypertension increases many-fold if you are able to eradicate the underlying disease.

– Dr. Andrea Looney, DVM